Kickstarter, this is only the beginning

Ah, the Kickstarter nay-sayers… A few month ago, when Tim Schafer managed to fund his point-and-click adventure game in less than 8 hours, the repeating machine that was the internet was screaming that it was not possible to raise more than an indie budget through crowdfunding. A month later, when Tim had raised over 3 million dollars (and still counting, since they are now accepting paypal orders), which is the budget of a HD PS2 game, the internet mass had change to: well it’s Tim Schafer and it’s adventure games but this probably wont happen again.

At that time, there were only 5 or 6 games ever presented on the Kicktarter website. Now, you say ? Its 228! Big names like Carmaggedon, Leisure Suit Larry, Shadowrun are making a comeback. Wasteland 2 raised almost as much money as Double Fine adventure, and of course, dozens of new devs started their small project this way and can now have an opportunity to show what they can do and build a fanbase. And still, this is only the beginning. Most gamers, believe it or not, haven’t ever heard of Kickstarter. I said it before, i’ll say it again: Kickstarter can really be the way to resurrect mid-budget games that where thriving during the last generation. But I’ll even go further than this: I’ll say that in two years you’ll have your first AAA crowdfunded game.

Reasons for this are obvious and I’ve already touched them on another post: crowdfunding is at the same time a way to cut off the middle man (and potentially let the developer earn 100% of what you pay instead of the mere 20 or 30% hey earn nowadays) and to improve gaming as a whole since it is a way to trust authors to realize their vision instead of publishers and marketing departments who are always one step behind. There will be blunder, there will be disappointments (like always), but crowdfunding, in the long run, is really a way for us to have our cake and eat it too.

We are only at the beginning. For example, Japan needs to build a bilingual Kickstarter site. Kickstarter only accepts project from America, and is only in English. But the Japanese game industry is probably the most adapted to the crowdfunding model.

First, Japan’s strength these ten years has been to allow game authors to put themselves forward (while a lot of publishers still prohibit it) and create auteur-driven games. Japan now has this unvaluable capital of game rockstar personas that are known worldwide among gamers: from the most famous like Hideo Kojima and Tetsuya Nomura to more obscure but still revered artistes like Yoko Taro (Nier) or Swery65 (Deadly Premonition), litteraly dozens of loved artists that can create the gathering that you need to make crowdfunding happen.

Second, Japanese gamers and Western Otakus are an avid and dedicated fanbase that will be easier than most other crowd to mobilize, especially with all the colllector editions and stuff you can offer with crowdfunding.

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